Drinking during your teenage may be causing damage to your verbal learning and memory performance in adult life.Brain Under Construction

We know that adolescence is a time of rapid growth and loads of neurobiological changes.

We also know that this is the same time that young people are more likely to start experimenting with alcohol and levels of consumption can be varied from person to person.

What we think is important is for everyone to understand what the effects might be on our bodies as an implication of crazy drinking behaviour during our teenage years.

Wants and Desires BrainTeenager years are for working out what we like and what we don’t like….. and this isn’t easy, especially when we have so many laws to get our heads around and rules to abide by (don’t even mention the adults we have to argue with to get where we want to be, right!?).

But informed decision making is really important whatever age you are, so as a young person don’t ever be afraid to ask ‘WHY?’. Questioning things is a good thing. Especially when it comes to what you are putting into your bodies. It then becomes your right to be aware of and understand the consequences of that action.

When we talk about alcohol consumption, it is important to remember that it can have an affect on your body in some way, regardless of the amount you consume.

CommunicationOne of the effects it might be worth remembering is the impact it may have on later
performance using your VERBAL LEARNING and MEMORY (VLM).

Research suggests that how our brains obtain new verbal information may be affected by the amount of alcohol we consume during adolescence (our teenage years). 

So just remember….experiment away, but make sure you are aware of how it might impact on you as an adult.

Final Thought: Consequences have Actions.

Useful YouTube clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2gVzVIBc_g&index=1&list=PLo3jC-t0sJNyI4OtyB0J61rvA7u7Myi0G
Related research article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160727172134.htm#.V6MA4oS5u3U.facebook

 

 


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